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Three Highly Contagious Diseases That Your Child Should Be Vaccinated Against

Getting mumps, measles, and chicken pox used to be considered basic childhood rites of passage from which few children were able to avoid. In fact, most parents of the past didn't do much to try to protect their children from coming down with these diseases because they are generally not life-threatening but can cause complications if they occur in adults. However, all three of these diseases are highly contagious, and thanks to modern medicine, vaccines are available that will protect both children and adults. Here's what you need to know about mumps, measles, and chicken pox and why you should speak with your pediatrician about immunizations. 

Mumps 

The average person who comes down with mumps will often go on to infect up to seven others with the disease -- and it can be spread by those showing no symptoms and who may not even realize that they are infected. Children can't typically receive the vaccination for mumps until they are over 12 months of age, which leaves infants particularly vulnerable. Those who have received chemotherapy or other treatments for cancer may also be advised by their physicians not to be vaccinated for mumps. Even though mumps is relatively mild most of the time, complications can cause conditions such deafness

Measles

Measles causes raised, itchy, red spots on the face and body accompanied by coughing, congestion, and itchy eyes and noses. Although measles has been nearly eradicated in the United States thanks to the efforts of modern medicine, it's still a common disease in many other countries. Even if you and your family won't be traveling abroad, getting a measles vaccination may nonetheless keep your child protected. Outbreaks of measles have been reported in some US communities in recent years, usually originating with immigrants or visitors from countries where it is still commonplace. 

Chickenpox

This quintessential childhood disease has historically been considered to be more of an extremely uncomfortable annoyance than any real threat. However, chickenpox can last for as long as 14 days, and most parents and children would prefer to avoid goes through this type of prolonged ordeal which included keeping the child from daycare, school, play dates, and pretty much anywhere involving being around other people. Vaccinations for chickenpox should begin when the child is around 12 months old.

Schedule an appointment with a pediatrician at a clinic like Advocare Haddon Pediatric Group at Haddon Heights to discuss the immunization of your children.

About Me

I have always loved taking good care of myself, but a few months ago, I realized that I was neglecting a big portion of my normal healthcare. For starters, I hadn't been to the doctor in years, and I really didn't know how to improve my health past a certain point. I started talking with my doctor, and he gave me some advice about feeling better each and every day. I wanted to make a blog all about understanding health care concerns and knowing how to make things right. Check out this blog for great information about health care and improving your life.

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